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Alexandria and Cairo

semi-overcast 80 °F

Skyline of Alexandria

Skyline of Alexandria

Saturday morning, we dock in Alexandria. My phone rings at 7am, requesting that I come down to the medical center. When I arrive, they take my temperature, and send me back to the room to wait. About an hour later, the phone rings and I'm released from quarantine.

I desperately try to contact Mr. David to see if I can resuscitate our tour, but I'm unsuccessful. I fly to the excursions office to see if there are any openings still available that can get me to Cairo, but alas, it is just too late. The convoy is getting ready to leave, and I'm not in it. I check with Joe May, the port expert, to see if tour operators are normally present at the port. He shakes his head and tells me that once the convoy leaves, there is no hope, as no independent operators will be available at the pier.

Not having eaten for well over 24 hours, and banned from the buffet (ship's rules...noro cases are requested to refrain from the buffet for an additional 2 days), we head to the dining room for breakfast. I order egg beaters. I receive a plate of chopped up soft-boiled eggs instead. I feel like crying.

Despondent, I wander down to the dock and browse through the souvenir stands, and chat a bit with Yousef, one of the vendors. The only other people at the pier are the local blue taxis, who are not interested in taking us to Cairo. As I'm preparing to head back to the ship with a few trinkets, a fellow in a red shirt approaches. He identifies himself as Mr. Mahruos, and claims to be a licensed tour guide. I take a look at his laminated badge. I have no idea if it's real or not. He points to a van in the far parking lot, and offers to take me to see the pyramids for a reasonable fee.

Mrs Z, wondering what the covert meeting was all about

Mrs Z, wondering what the covert meeting was all about

I tear back to my room and let Mrs. Z know. We debate a few moments if it is wise to go driving off with a total stranger with no references in post-revolution Egypt. Given the unlikelihood of ever returning to Egypt again, we decide to take the risk, and quickly get our stuff together.

Mahruos has a driver with him, whose name escaped me if it was ever even mentioned. His mini-van is actually very well kept, and we begin to feel a bit more at ease. Mahruos's English is somewhat limited, so he spends much of the three hour drive along the "desert route" to Cairo talking with his driver, but he does periodically fill us in on the sights along the way.

Scenery along the desert road

Scenery along the desert road

Mahruos tells us that we are the first customers he has had since January, prior to the revolution. The people in the tourism industry are really hurting. We are the really the first large ship that has made port in Alexandria in months.

Three hours and one rest stop later, we arrive in Cairo.

The first order of business is to head up to the plateau overlooking the pyramids. There is a turnout where there is a perfect vantage point for photos with all three of the main pyramids framed against the city of Cairo. It's really quite amazing how close the city actually is.

The Pyramids at Giza

The Pyramids at Giza

It's very quiet here. There are few tourists, and due to our late start, most of the cruise-shippers have already come and gone. Vendors are persistent in their attempts to sell us trinkets. We would be willing to purchase some and spread some money around, but Mahruos is adamant that we avoid interacting with them. We drive back down the road so that we can approach the pyramids themselves.

Vendors at Giza

Vendors at Giza

I've seen the pyramids a thousand times, in books, movies, & TV. Until I stood there in person, I never really appreciated the enormous scale of these structures. No matter what you may think, the pyramids are simply bigger than you imagine (and the Sphinx is probably a good deal smaller than you imagine). To paraphrase Mrs. Zukini, "Wow!"

Practically deserted

Practically deserted

I'm sure you've all seen photos of the blocks that make up the pyramids, much like this one:

Great Pyramid

Great Pyramid

But, until you stand next to just one of those rows of blocks, it's difficult to conceive just how enormous they actually are:

Dwarfed by the Great Pyramid

Dwarfed by the Great Pyramid

We next move on to the Solar Boat. Found disassembled and carefully wrapped in a tomb of its own in front of the Great Pyramid, this boat was meant to convey the Pharaoh on his journey to the next life. It has been completely reassembled and installed in its own exhibition hall right next to the pyramid, and should not be missed.

Tomb of the Solar Boat

Tomb of the Solar Boat

The Solar Boat

The Solar Boat

Finally, we move over to the Sphinx compound, where we are encouraged to drop a few Euros through a grate in the floor for no comprehensible reason.

Good luck cash

Good luck cash

As I mentioned, it seems to me that the Sphinx is actually much smaller than I've imagined it to be, but an impressive sight, and one we very nearly didn't have the opportunity to see.

The Sphinx

The Sphinx

The Sphinx

The Sphinx

It's starting to get late. Mahruos offers to set us up at a hotel for the evening, but we decide that we would prefer to head back to the ship. I'm still not feeling my best, and there's still the possibility that Mrs. Z may become ill, so it seems a wiser course to call it a day. Mahruos pressures us into a stop at close, claustrophobic perfume shop, but we quickly bail out of there for the three hour ride back through congested Alexandria traffic. When we arrive back at the ship, Mahruos waits while I head back to our stateroom for the Euros I need to pay him.

We did it! We made it to the pyramids, although not nearly the way we had planned. I feel terrible that we couldn't reach Egypt Private Excursions, especially when he contacts us later that evening to express his concern for my health, and his regret that we missed our opportunity to visit his country. I don't have the heart to tell him that we found another operator, especially after seeing first-hand how the economy in Egypt has been affected by the revolution.

(For those of you who may have seen my review of this trip on another website, you may have noticed that in that review I omitted that we ultimately made it to Cairo. I truly felt horrible about stiffing Mr. David, and did not want him to know that we found a guide at the pier after cancelling with him, and I knew he had been following my posts in that forum. Mea culpa.)

We discover that our decision to avoid the overnight stay turned out to be a smart one a few minutes past midnight, when Mrs. Z is hit hard by the same virus. When the medical center suggests that she should come pay them a visit, our biggest question is how, exactly, is she supposed to DO that??? They reply that a laundry bag or two might be helpful.

So, several injections of anti-nausea drugs later, our quarantine is reinstated. This time, we stay together, since I've already been exposed. The med center suggests that the current passenger complement skews a bit older than it normally would, and is therefore more at risk for serious complications. I'm asked to be very cautious and to avoid exposing other passengers as much as possible.

Mrs. Z is so violently ill, that I can't imagine how we would have handled it if we were in a hotel in Cairo when it hit her, or how we would have managed to get from Cairo back to the ship.

The second quarantine lasts a full 50 hours, so there's a pretty long gap where I can't describe much about shipboard life, except to talk about the unsung heroes. The "special team" that takes care of quarantined passengers have got to have one of the worst jobs in the world, yet they do it with courtesy and with a smile (I think...they often were wearing masks). Not only do they have to work with bio hazardous wastes, they have to deal with grumpy and disappointed passengers, and the near certainty of getting sick themselves, all on a crew member's wage. I'm sure this isn't the duty they signed up for, and my hat's off to them.

Next entry, we'll be skipping ahead to our release from quarantine the morning of our port call in Chios. Don't worry, it gets better from here, and the photos shall return.

Doooom

Doooom

Posted by Zukini 12:57 Archived in Egypt Tagged cairo alexandria pyramids Comments (0)

Chios, Greece

sunny 75 °F

Well, we've lost a full 50 hours. It's now Tuesday and at 6am, the med center calls to spring us from quarantine, in time for our Princess excursion to Pyrgi and Mesta. Typically, we prefer to bypass Princess excursions in favor of private guides or DYI, but Chios doesn't really have any independent tour operators that we can find, and we're not interested in renting a car here.

We're to meet our bus shoreside at 11:20am, so we tender off the ship around 10am. The ship is using its own tenders, and the process is very smooth. We're on the quay at Chios town in just a few minutes.

We stroll along the harbor front, exploring the little shops and cafes along the way. Chios is exactly how you would expect a Mediterranean port to look.

Chios Harbor

Chios Harbor

The waterfront is filled with cafe's serving tourists and locals. Crusty old men play backgammon with cracking vengeance while smoking and drinking coffee. Cold coffee drinks seem to be the preferred libation here. After exploring the waterfront and back row a bit, we decide to sit down at a cafe to have a bite to eat. We order a cappuccino for Mrs. Z, an espresso for me, and a plate of loukoumades (donuts). The donuts are unique, almost like carnival food. A delicately fried exterior, a soft, custardy center, and 14 ounces of lemony honey are served up on a plate with mandatory knives and forks.

Loukoumades

Loukoumades

Indeed, the donuts even come with their very own crusty seaman, Alexander, a local who sits down with us and asks every question in the universe about the specifications of the Star Princess, noting them down with great satisfaction on a napkin. He tells us tales of his life as a former sea captain, and a rambling tale of meeting Queen Beatrix of the Netherlands. We enjoy passing the time with him.

At 11:20, we board our tour bus, and are introduced to Barbara, our Greek tour guide. We take a pleasant drive through the hills of southern Chios, on our way to Pyrgi. Chios is an amazing place. To the north are arid, barren mountains. To the south are arid, tree covered hills. Everywhere, we see fruit trees, pistachios, and of course the ubiquitous mastic trees that it is famous for.

The Chios countryside

The Chios countryside

We arrive at Pyrgi, one of the medieval mastic villages, know as the "painted village" because of the black and white sgraffito that covers nearly every home. This is achieved by placing a grey stucco coat on each home, then whitewashing over it. When the whitewash has dried, it's scraped off to reveal repeating patterns of the underlying grey stucco.

The Homes of Pyrgi

The Homes of Pyrgi

Sgrafitto walls in Pyrgi

Sgrafitto walls in Pyrgi

Our guide walks us through the twisting, maze like streets of this castle town, and brings us to the Church of the Apostles, St. Peter and Paul, an ancient Greek Orthodox church that just oozes centuries of religious hopes and dreams. No photos are allowed inside, so here's an exterior shot. That's Barbara, our tour guide, in the foreground.

Byzantine Church at Pyrgi

Byzantine Church at Pyrgi

Then, it's back on the bus to our next stop. The sextons of the church hitch a ride with us, as they want to get back to Chios, eventually. They bring a huge bag of bread and sandwiches along with them and munch them as we drive.

The next stop is the masticchoria (Mastic Town) of Mesta, another castle town. Chios is a supplier to the world of gum from the unique mastic trees. This gum is used in a variety of cosmetic and edible products, and is considered to be antiseptic as well as tasty. We later found that the unique chewy texture of Turkish ice cream is due to the use of this mastic gum.

Streets of Mesta

Streets of Mesta

Mesta is filled with incredible, tunnel-like streets winding, again, in a maze, to the central square.

The Fortress town of Mesta

The Fortress town of Mesta


Our tourguide takes us to visit the ancient orthodox church of Palaios Taxiarchis, with it's elaborately carved altar screen. Even for a non-religous person, it's an interesting experience. In the middle of the church, a large sandbox is set up, and tapers are available for a donation. I drop a coin, and DW lights a taper in memory of a recently deceased aunt. It's an emotional experience.

We sit at a tavern in the square and enjoy a Coke, served in thick, old fashioned, glass bottles. A Canadian woman asks to have our trash...apparently, her son collects Coke bottles of different nationalities. Go figure.

Cafe in the Town Square at Mesta

Cafe in the Town Square at Mesta

These old villages are really a scenic stop in a port that was kind of low on our list of priorities. We find ourselves falling in love with Chios.

The winding alleys of Mesta

The winding alleys of Mesta

After Mesta, it's back to Chios town and the ship. A very pleasant, albeit short, excursion. Unfortunately, the heat, sun, and jostling bus has left Mrs. Z feeling under the weather again. We head to the dining room for dinner anyway. She spots spaghetti and meatballs on the menu, and figures it will be a good bet, along with some nippy peach soup. I go for the shrimp fra diavolo. When DW's meal arrives, she cuts into the first meatball, and finds it bright pink inside. That's enough for her! The staff seems to feel truly awful, and does back flips trying to make her happy. They do up a special plate of pasta, cooked fresh for her, and she eats a bit, but her appetite is really not up to it.

Tonight, it's Variety Showtime with Noel & Victoria and Lovena B. Fox in the Princess Theater, and Tron:Legacy is on the MUTS screen. Still a little worn out from our previous illness, we decide to make an early night of it.

Tomorrow, a wonderful day in Istanbul is on the menu.

Posted by Zukini 20:55 Archived in Greece Tagged greece cruise chios star_princess khios Comments (0)

A Tour of Istanbul with Fatih Copuroglu

The Topkapi Palace

sunny 79 °F

Wednesday, May 25th, we arrive in Istanbul. Joe May is on hand to give his running commentary on the open decks as we make the scenic sail into the Golden Horn. The spires and minarets of Istanbul shine in the early morning sun.

Istanbul

Istanbul

Today we have a private tour, arranged through Ephesus Deluxe. They've given us a package price for a combo tour of Istanbul and Ephesus. It turns out Ephesus Deluxe doesn't really have guides as such in Istanbul. Instead, they subcontract to local guides in the city.

We meet our guide, Fatih Copuroglu, right outside the customs building, and he immediately makes us feel welcome. His van is designed perfectly for touring, plush and comfortable, with facing seats in the back. As the driver takes us across the Galata bridge and to our first site, Fatih gives us a running commentary, filling us in on the history of Istanbul and Turkey with a real depth of knowledge and passion for the subject. Our first stop will be the Topkapi Palace, hopefully to beat the crowds. Unfortunately, with two ships in port, that's a little hard to do.

Gate of Salutation

Gate of Salutation

We enter the literally palatial grounds of Topkapi, and are immediately awed, which is, I suppose, what the Sultan had in mind.

Fatih is with us every step of the way, pointing out interesting details and features, putting things into historical context, and generally doing everything you ever imagined a professional tourguide would do. First we tour the Harem, the apartments and courtyards for the female members of the palace family. These include the apartments of the Sultan's concubines, as well as the Valide Sultan, the Queen Mother.

Courtyard of the Eunuchs

Courtyard of the Eunuchs

Courtyard of the Sultan Valide

Courtyard of the Sultan Valide

Courtyard of the Concubines

Courtyard of the Concubines

Everywhere you look, the palace is appointed with sumptuous details. The walls are covered with elaborate tile work, the doors exhibit stunning marquetry with mother-of-pearl and tortoise-shell inlay, even the Sultan's horse-path is laid with an intricate design.

Only the Sultan's horse was permitted to tread these paths.

Only the Sultan's horse was permitted to tread these paths.

Privy Chamber of Murad III

Privy Chamber of Murad III

The above is the Privy Chamber of Sultan Murad III. When it was built, he included dozens of fountains in niches on the walls.

The white noise of the fountains provided a sound screen of privacy for the Sultan as he discussed important matters of state, preventing bodyguards and supplicants from eavesdropping.

The formula for the red glaze on these tiles has been lost to history

The formula for the red glaze on these tiles has been lost to history

An example of the intricate tilework from the Iznik region

An example of the intricate tilework from the Iznik region

In its heyday, the palace must have been a sight to behold.

We also visit the treasury, now a museum, and view stunning works of gold an precious jewels. It's a fascinating place I've read much about in fiction, now brought to life.

Strategically placed mirrors alert the Sultan to assassins, unwelcome guests, and tourists.

Strategically placed mirrors alert the Sultan to assassins, unwelcome guests, and tourists.

The Arz Odas1, The Audience Chamber

The Arz Odas1, The Audience Chamber

We exit the Palace, on the way to our next stop. Fatih picks up some roasted hazelnuts for us to munch, and I get excited about seeing simit on the cart, so he grabs one for us, and we all share it. Turkish Lira are the currency here. We're not carrying any, but Fatih has us covered.

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Posted by Zukini 20:45 Archived in Turkey Tagged palace istanbul topkapi Comments (0)

Istanbul - Touring Sultanahmet

sunny 79 °F

Our next stop is the Aya Sofia (or Hagia Sophia).

The Hagia Sofia

The Hagia Sofia

This is another show stopper, and we tour both the ground floor and the upper gallery. The mass of the structure is incredible to behold. Rather than the soaring spaces of more modern structures, you can see and feel the brawn that holds up the enormous dome. The dome itself, although not as tall as the one at St. Peter's, is actually even bigger in diameter. It's hard to get a sense of scale from photos, but the interior is vast. It must have been a most awe inspiring place when it was built.

Inside the Hagia Sophia

Inside the Hagia Sophia

On the second floor, you gain a real sense of the enormous stresses the structure is under, viewing the warped floors, vaults, and columns.

Twisted Columns on the upper level of the Hagia Sophia

Twisted Columns on the upper level of the Hagia Sophia

The other major draw here is the mosaic work, on such an enormous scale and so finely crafted that it appears to be paint at first, the ceiling and walls were once covered by semi precious stones in glittering mosaics that were plastered over when the space was converted to a mosque. Now, some of the mosaics have been restored.

Uncovered mosaics in the Hagia Sophia

Uncovered mosaics in the Hagia Sophia

Detail of the precious mosaics

Detail of the precious mosaics

We also viewed the huge bronze doors, appropriated from southern Turkey, that turned out to be too big to fit in their intended doorway, and the lovely book-matched marble panels that line many of the walls.

A minaret, silhouetted against the blue sky

A minaret, silhouetted against the blue sky

Leaving the Aya Sofia, we view the Hippodrome, which includes the top two thirds of an obelisk relocated here from Luxor by the emperor Theodotus.

The Obelisk at the Hippodrome

The Obelisk at the Hippodrome

Now, it's down to the cools spaces of the Basilica Cistern. Once a major water supply for the city, filled to the top of the vaults with fresh water, it's now a moodily lit underground forest of columns on a shimmering lake. It's both beautiful and atmospheric, and is often used as a venue for musical concerts and weddings.

The Basilica Cistern

The Basilica Cistern

We walk to the furthest reaches to view the Medusa heads, propping up ancient columns. These Roman Medusas were wedged under columns at the very rear edge of the cistern, facing the wall and placed upside down and sideways to nullify any bad luck associated with using them as building material.

A Medusa Head used as a foundation in the Basilica Cistern

A Medusa Head used as a foundation in the Basilica Cistern

Lunchtime brings us to the Pudding House. It's recommend by Fatih, and he laughingly admits that he gets to eat there for free, as long as he brings in customers. We don't mind, and I enjoy a meat-stuffed aubergine, eggplant stuffed with a spiced meat and topped with mashed potato. Mrs. Z decides to eat a bit, and enjoys some kofte, a spiced Turkish flattened meatball. We finish off lunch with Turkish coffee, thick and full of grounds, and apple tea. Restrooms are upstairs, clean, and monitored by an attendant handing out hand towels, so be prepared with a small tip.

We backtrack toward the Mosque of Sultan Ahmed, better known as the "Blue Mosque" because of the thousands of blue Iznik tiles covering the walls. We pass through the refreshing spray of a park fountain on on our way there.

Enjoying the mist from the fountain

Enjoying the mist from the fountain

We've come prepared with bags for our shoes and a scarf for Mrs. Z. Fatih tells us she doesn't need to cover her head, as she's a tourist, but she insists.

The Blue Mosque

The Blue Mosque

We enter the beatiful mosque and soak it in. Of course, the attraction here is the Iznik tiles, but honestly, we were able to view them much better in the Palace.

Inside the Blue Mosque of Sultan Ahmed

Inside the Blue Mosque of Sultan Ahmed

Inside the Blue Mosque of Sultan Ahmed

Inside the Blue Mosque of Sultan Ahmed

Nevertheless, we enjoy our visit to yet another of the world's premier places of worship. Fatih seems genuinely moved that we showed such respect for his religion by being prepared to carry our shoes and insisting on covering Mrs. Zuke's head.

Finally, although we certainly have misgivings, we allow Fatih to bring us to Nakkas, a "carpet maker". He's been upfront with us all along about it, and says that we might enjoy seeing the goods even if we don't purchase. We agree to go in. After a brief, but interesting demonstration of carpet weaving, we move upstairs to the showroom. There, with great fanfare and flair, we are shown a dazzling array of hand knotted carpets, wool and silk.

The carpets themselves were amazing. If had anyplace to put them, I truly might have been tempted. We explain that we are very impressed with the quality, but simply are not in the market. Our host is very gracious, not pushy at all, and offers to show us his jewelry and ceramic shop as well. Our eye is caught by the ceramic shop and we go in. The handcrafted work here is just amazing. We buy a quartz glazed plate in an intricate blue design after bargaining just a little. We feel we've paid a fair price for the quality of the workmanship.

It' been a long but amazing day. I'm very impressed with the welcoming atmosphere in Istanbul, and the way Turkey has seemed to successfully combined a 98% Muslim population and a secular government. There's an air of tolerance and openness here that I had not expected. This is a place I would not mind visiting for a longer period of time on a land-based tour. Fatih has done an outstanding job, and I'd recommend him highly if you're looking for a tour in Istanbul. You can reach him at fatih @ copuroglu.com.

We skip dinner tonight, and relax on our balcony. Tonight, the Princess Theater is featuring "Movie Night" with a presentation of "Little Fockers". The production show, Motor City, is being held in the smaller Vista Lounge.

Next up, Kusadasi and the ancient ruins of Ephesus.
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Posted by Zukini 21:23 Archived in Turkey Tagged istanbul blue_mosque hagia_sophia hippodrome basilica_cistern aya_sofia Comments (0)

Kusadasi and Ephesus

sunny 90 °F

It's Thursday, May 26th, and the Star Princess is making a noon stop in Kusadasi, the jumping-off point for the ruins of ancient Ephesus.

The port of Kusadasi

The port of Kusadasi

We have a relaxing morning, and meet our tour guide from Ephesus Deluxe at the cruise terminal. Her name is Gülçin, which means "person gathering roses", but she tells us to call her Rose. I'll do that here as well, since it's a pain in the neck to type those Turkish characters. We again have a van setup for touring, and off we go to the ruins at Ephesus.

Rose is a little soft spoken, so we have a hard time following her commentary as we travel. We pass some of the beach resorts, and pass through Rose's hometown of Selçuk. It takes about 25 minutes to get to Ephesus, and it is beastly hot. When we arrive, souvenir vendors are trying to sell guidebooks at ridiculous prices (30 Euros but they'll bargain down to 10). We decline.

The site is again astounding. It is another complete city that was abandoned due to malaria and a change in the course of the river, very much like Ostia Antica. Even the layout of the city is similar, with a government district, a commercial district, and a necropolis. Although the city dates back to the 2nd century BC, most of the ruins here are from the later Roman occupation.

Clay pipes, still waiting for the plumber to show up.

Clay pipes, still waiting for the plumber to show up.

As we are lead around, we start to get a real sense of how the puzzle pieces of history all fit together. The selection of cities on this cruise really emphasizes the cross pollination that has occurred in this region.

Overlooking the center of Ephesus

Overlooking the center of Ephesus

Of course, Ephesus has a lot of significance to Christians. Nearby is the "House of the Virgin Mary", believed by many to be the home where Mary was taken to live by St. John. The ruins at Ephesus also contain what is believed to be the tomb of St. Luke.

Trajan's Fountain

Trajan's Fountain

The scope of the city is quite large. It contains both an Odeon and the much larger Great Theater, so you can imagine the throngs of citizens that once filled them.

The Odeon

The Odeon

The Great Theater

The Great Theater

The ruins are fascinating, but the heat is punishing. Rose tells us about each area we visit, then runs off to a shady spot while we explore. A couple of standouts include this sculpture of Athena Nike. Look carefully at the folds of her gown on the left side...that was the inspiration for the trademarked Nike "swoosh".

Athena Nike

Athena Nike

At the Temple of Hadrian, the now familiar Medusa stands guard.

Temple of Hadrian

Temple of Hadrian

Another popular spot is the men's latrine. It was engineered with running water under the seats, to carry waste away, and running water in the trough in front of the seats, for washing...the sponge. The sponge, on the stick. That you would share.

The Latrine

The Latrine

The big signature structure here at Ephesus is the iconic Library of Celsius. This is largely restored and reconstructed, but still is an imposing facade.

Library of Celsius

Library of Celsius

Just beyond, in a covered structure, are the Terrace Houses, which require a separate admission fee. These are essentially Roman insulae transplanted to the hills of Ephesus, and they are in an astounding state of preservation, with many of the frescoes and mosaics still intact.

The Terrace Houses

The Terrace Houses

The painted walls are still intact

The painted walls are still intact

Our last stop is a short visit to the remains of the Temple of Artemis, once one of the 7 ancient wonders. Now, it is a lone pillar in a neglected field of rubble and grass.

What's left of the Temple of Artemis

What's left of the Temple of Artemis

At the Temple, we're approached by two rival booksellers, both trying to sell us the same book. Fortunately, a tour bus pulled up at that moment, so we were able to escape. Rose asks us if we want to shop for leather work or carpets. We decline, and she sits in the front seat and ignores us for the ride back to port. I can't say I was crazy about her services, especially contrasted with Fatih the day before.

We visit the buffet for the first time since our illness tonight. It's a very early dinner, before they even really changed over from lunch. We then head up to the Lotus Pool, which is deserted.

Tonight's entertainment choices are Motor City in the Vista Lounge, "The Black Swan" in the Princess Theater, and "Toy Story 3" at MUTS.

Overnight, we'll wind our way across the Aegean for our stop in Piraeus, the port for Athens.

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Posted by Zukini 21:25 Archived in Turkey Tagged ruins turkey ephesus kusadasi Comments (0)

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